Ways of being

Ways of being

The anthropologist in me is always fascinated by alternate ways of seeing and doing. A writing assignment on waste management a few years ago was something of a turning point for me, as it brought home just how destructive our lifestyle of excess and waste is. It kickstarted a desire to tread a little lighter; to learn how to do things a bit differently.Since then, I’ve stumbled upon minimalism, the zero waste movement, urban farming, permaculture – whole new worlds are being opened up. These schools of thought all feed into each other, offering alternatives to our consumer-mad society, and I’m dabbling in them all as I figure out what resonates, what sticks, and what’ll get us closer to living just a bit greener and wilder in our sliver of suburbia.

In her food forest in the heart of the suburbs, Saskia Schelling of Urban Farmstead grows an abundance of fruit and veggies; it’s a thriving model of permaculture. Here she sheds some light on what permaculture is:

What is permaculture?
“For me that’s like asking ‘What is Life?’ ​The term Permaculture – Permanent Agriculture or Permanent Culture – was​ coined by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, then later taken on by Geoff Lawton and others.

Permaculture is a highly effective way to design for a future of abundance, not just of food, but in every sense of the word. ​It’s often defined as ‘the ​conscious design and maintenance of agriculturally productive ecosystems and human living environments, which have the diversity, stability, and the strength of natural eco-systems.’

What this means is that ​permaculture design mimic​s​ nature in every sense – the natural laws, the organising principles and the patterns and interconnections that naturally occur in ecosystems.

Permaculture isn’t just about growing great organic veggies –  although of course it does encompass these things. Neither is it a ‘plug and paste’ solution (ie one solution fits all environments).

The power of observation​
The permaculture principles, one of which is Observation, need to be applied to each and every site. You ​need to observe the soil ph, the natural biomes, the plants, azimuths, contours, ​people, land uses, natural vegetation, and insects.

Part of the beauty is that the actual design and solutions appear out of the process. If you follow all the design steps systematically, the design seems to present itself miraculously. The layers and layers of ‘data’ gathered through observation are overlaid and this, together with the visions and wishes of the stakeholders, informs the mainframe design.

For example, after mapping and observation, it’ll become obvious that a soggy, marshy part of a property is not the best place to erect a house – instead, it may be the perfect place to build a dam perhaps, or plant water-loving plants.

Nothing in isolation
Permaculture also takes into account the economic, social and environmental aspects of a habitat. ​ It’s ​principles ​can be used​ to shift stale or ​stagnant working environments into healthy, vibrant, flowing, productive ones. It serves as a basis from which to make holistic, viable decisions, whether in corporate or private arenas.

The ​are three permaculture ethics which are key to healthy interactions with the earth and with each other. They are Care for the land; Care for the people; and Share the Surplus.

To read about Saskia’s super inspiring story and find out about upcoming workshops, see here. And to learn more about Permaculture in South Africa, have a look at Love Green Permaculture.

A passionate permaculturalist

A passionate permaculturalist

Arriving at Saskia’s house in the suburbs, there’s nothing to prepare you for the abundant food forest contained within its walls. Over a period of 5 or so years, Saskia has toiled, tirelessly, to transform her conventional suburban garden into a thriving model of permaculture.

Her passion is contagious. Below is just some of what Saskia had to say about her journey. I’ll be sharing more of her wisdom and insights in further instalments of this post, but for now…

What motivated you to start growing your own food?
I’ve always had a passion for growing edibles and for gardening. This stems, I suspect, from many hours spent watching my mothers’ veggie gardens thrive; the taste and smell of just-pulled carrots still hanging onto some good earth; freshly plucked strawberries and sweet sweet figs; oooh and those apricots!

I also have memories of myself in my toddler years, pre-teens and teens on my grandparents small holding in Pretoria, conversing with the chickens, sheep, peacock and tadpoles and observing the fascinating processes of my grandfather’s honey collecting, biltong-making; and planting and harvesting of maize and other earthly goodnesses.

It was however, not until Kent Tahir Cooper walked into my yoga classes some 7 years ago, that my passion for permaculture was truly ignited and fuelled. I ‘interned’ myself under the watchful and mindful guidance of Tahir, by intensely converting our run-of-the-mill urban garden into a zone of permaculture abundance.

It took many hours of sweat, perseverance, many challenges, and extremely late nights watching movie upon movie: from Bill Mollison to Geoff Lawton and everything in between. I stopped at nothing – to my family’s frustration. I measured and walked and observed every corner of the property and implemented the permaculture principles without holding back.

Some of the benefits?
The compounding benefits I observed whilst working with nature thrilled me, not only in respect of my own personal health, but also in the health of this patch of urban space. The more intensely I worked and connected with the earth, following the permaculture principles and techniques, the more I observed positive shifts and the unquestionable regeneration of this ecosystem within ecosystems that I call our home. My family then followed as they began to experience the shifts too, and to taste the fruits of our labour – literally.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Saskia’s apricot tree with the fruit covered in kaolin clay to keep the fruit flies at bay. It was a bumper crop and she made jam with the excess. She says “I used very little sugar, enjoyed the process, and the jam turned out to be surprisingly super-tangy delicious. So I put it down to beginner’s luck and yet another great philosophy learnt for life: a little bit of this, a little bit of that (‘diversity’ in permaculture lingo), enjoy the process – and voila!”

We also began to notice the cost-saving in terms of veggies and fruits and herbs; and the petrol saved from driving to the shops and back; and the health benefits of eating home-grown fresh produce. Our friends and family noticed too and started asking for help to implement the same at their homes; then came our children’s friends asking questions, and so the children’s workshops came into being; and then came the demand for planter boxes to house the veggies, so we started to make those. The garden and system continued to develop until we had surplus knowledge and plants and produce to share, and now we love to share!

The journey continues to unfold as every day brings new challenges, new ideas, new solutions waiting to be revealed.

Top tips for someone wanting to start a veggie garden?

  • Observe, observe and observe your site.
  • Involve all of the stakeholders right from the beginning whether you are working with your own home, an NGO, a corporate or private individuals. Obtain EVERYONE’S input, ideas and vision.
  • If you possibly can, attend a good internationally accredited PDC (Permaculture Design Course) that has a reputable reputation and is facilitated by experienced permaculture practitioners; or obtain advice and guidance from an experienced trained permaculture practitioner.
  • Design a sound viable Mainframe Plan. Without this, you set yourself up for possible disappointment down the line.
  • Plant what you eat, and not what you don’t.
  • Have fun and enjoy the journey!

Your favourite things to grow? And things you’d love to grow in the future?
Too many to name but here are a few: tamarillos (tree tomatoes); Italian tree tomatoes (actually tomatoes – huge ones); asparagus; bananas; granadillas; tulsi; ashwaganda (the bull-bulls love them!); watercress; pear-melons; grapes; zucchini; beans; peas; figs; brussels sprouts; sweet potatoes (edible, pretty, groundcovers – why on earth would anyone BUY them. They LOVE growing in sandy soil and are so abundant!); lemons; apricots; celery; kale; chard.

I’d love to grow a large abundant sage bush – for some reason sage just doesn’t grow well in our soil. I’d love to grow kiwi fruit, and coffee, and litchis and coconuts, but our micro-climate is not quite ready for those additions as yet. And we LOVE to collect our own eggs! We also LOVE to grow our heirloom veggie and herb seedlings; indigenous plants and pioneer plants for ourselves, our friends and family and the greater community.

banana circle in chicken area
Banana circle in chicken area

*Stay tuned for more from Saskia. And to read more about Urban Farmstead’s workshops, check out their site here.

Mucking in

Mucking in

Composting, for us, is mostly about diverting waste from our alarmingly full, toxic landfills. Haphazard in our approach, we’re learning as we bumble along and don’t harvest a huge amount of compost – and when we do, it’s an added bonus on our journey of waste reduction.

Yesterday I attended the most inspiring workshop at Urban Farmstead, where I learnt that, just like baking, there’s a composting recipe you can follow. The workshop was facilitated by permaculturalist Saskia Schelling and herbalist Karen Parkin.  Over a period of 6 years, Saskia has toiled tirelessly to transform her suburban garden into a thriving food forest. Passionate about sharing her hard-won knowledge, the workshop was practical, mucky and hands-on. We added layer upon layer of organic material to create the most awesome compost heap. Here’s how it went down and some of what I learnt:

img_6275
Base layer – carbon-rich straw. Ideal size for the heap is 1.5 m wide by 1.5 m high – and as long as you like. This facilitates efficient heat build-up.
img_6276
Next up – nitrogen-rich horse manure. To generate heat and kick off decomposition, compost heaps need a good mix of carbon and nitrogen (more carbon than nitrogen). Saskia sources her manure from the local stables.
img_6280
More straw, then mineral-packed, nitrogen rich seaweed, foraged from our coastline.
img_6296
Some fresh cut greens for more of a nitrogen kick. Greens also store nutrients and minerals such as potassium and phosphorous in their leaves which are released during decomposition.
img_6301
Kitchen scraps, clay and – a key ingredient – water. The compost heap needs to be moist but not waterlogged. We learnt a nifty trick: squeeze a handful of the compost really tight, if a few drops trickle out, you’ve got the moisture content more or less right.
img_6309
More ‘brown’ matter to up the carbon content – newspapers and more straw. It’s worth noting that you don’t have to do it in this order, or with these particular materials, just work with what you have to balance the carbon and nitrogen. And you don’t need to layer either – you can mix it all up before creating the heap.
img_6315
Voila! A magnificent heap, ready to start working its magic.
img_6319
Within days the heap will start heating up. You’ll need to check the temperature in about 3 weeks – it should be hot (you can use a stick or an iron rod to gauge the temp, which should be hot to the touch). When the heap starts cooling down again, you’ll need to turn it (which sounds like quite a job!). 3 weeks after turning, it should be ready for harvesting.

That’s the very basic recipe, to be tweaked and adjusted to suit your needs and lifestyle. We tend to ‘cold compost’, adding bits of waste to a small bin which decomposes over a long time – months to a year. But if you’re a keen composter in Cape Town, looking to churn out beautiful compost quickly, get yourself to Urban Farmstead, to learn the best way – by doing.